(Background courtesy of the Hubble Telescope)

ruinedchildhood:

Bikini Bottom just got real..

gothlolita:

imagine if you woke up and your name was your url and you looked exactly like your icon

rattyrattyjo:

I made a Powerpoint!
Feel free to add any info that I left out that you think is important~

frenchie-fries:

vergess:

boltonsrepairshop:

PSA - PLEASE READ AND SPREAD HE WORD!!!

IF YOU SEE THIS PLANT AT ALL, DO NOT TOUCH IT!!!

Giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum) is an invasive herb in the carrot family which was originally brought to North America from Asia and has since become established in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Northwest regions of the United States. Giant hogweed grows along streams and rivers and in fields, forests, yards and roadsides, and a giant hogweed plant can reach 14 feet or more in height with compound leaves up to 5 feet in width.

Giant Hogweed sap contains toxic chemicals known as Furanocoumarins. When these chemicals come into contact with the skin and are exposed to sunlight, they cause a condition called Phytophotodermatitis, a reddening of the skin often followed by severe blistering and burns. These injuries can last for several months, and even after they have subsided the affected areas of skin can remain sensitive to light for years. Furanocoumarins are also carcinogenic and teratogenic, meaning they can cause cancer and birth defects. The sap can also cause temporary (or even permanent) blindness if introduced into the eyes.

If someone comes into physical contact with Giant Hogweed, the following steps should be taken:
  • Wash the affected area thoroughly with soap and COLD water as soon as possible.
  • Keep the exposed area away from sunlight for 48 hours.
  • If Hogweed sap gets into the eyes, rinse them with water and wear sunglasses.
  • See a doctor if any sign of reaction sets in.
If a reaction occurs, the early application of topical steroids may lessen the severity of the reaction and ease the discomfort. The affected area of skin may remain sensitive to sunlight for a few years, so applying sun block and keeping the affected area shielded from the sun whenever possible are sensible precautions
PLEASE, DO NOT JUST READ AND SCROLL! THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT AND POTENTIALLY LIFE-SAVING INFORMATION!!!

Extra note: if you live in Oregon, New Jersey, Michigan or New York and see one of these, call your state’s department of agriculture to report it, and trained professionals will come kill it before it can produce seeds and spread.

Frankly, if you see one in general, probably call your DOA and see if there’s a program in place.

Do not burn it, because the smoke will give you the same reaction.

If for some ungodly reason there isn’t a professional who can handle it for you (and please, please use a professional), the DOA of New York has [this guide] for how to deal with it yourself.

OH MY FUCK I HAVE THESE IN MY BACKYARD.

cometotheartside:

pinklikeme:

carry-on-my-wayward-butt:

musik-box:

This is 100% what everyone does in their room when they are alone, and this girl filmed it. Bravo.

this is my favorite video in all of human history

I WAS LOOKING FOR THIS THE OTHER DAY THIS CUTE GIRL her laugh is so infectious goddammit

Dying.

adopt-an-other:

Every year, a few months after Easter, the shelter experiences a flood of young rabbits. We call this the “post-Easter rush”.
This happens because every year, people buy baby rabbits at pet stores as Easter presents, usually for children. In a couple of months, these baby balls of fluff have grown up to be teenagers: active, curious, destructive, hormonal and messy. And then they end up at the shelter.
So a friendly reminder this weekend! Rabbits:
* Can live over 10 years with proper care
* Should be spayed/neutered for better health & behaviour
* Should see a specialized vet for medical care
* Prefer not to be picked up and cuddled
* Should live in a pen or free-range, NOT in a pet store cage
* Are not the best choice of pets for small children
* Are high-maintenance pets!
If you’re going to buy a rabbit this weekend, make it a chocolate one.
If you’re serious about getting a rabbit as a pet, stop and do some research, and then look at local shelters for adoption - most of them will even come spayed/neutered. Don’t buy from a pet store. Try and get an adult rabbit, or if you want to get a young rabbit, do some more research, because just like puppies and kittens, young rabbits need some extra care.
For more info on proper rabbit care, check out the House Rabbit Society:
http://rabbit.org/
Or the Ontario Rabbit Education Organization:
http://ontariorabbits.org/
Or hey, you can send me an ask!
But please, if you’re giving a rabbit as a gift this Easter, make it chocolate.

adopt-an-other:

Every year, a few months after Easter, the shelter experiences a flood of young rabbits. We call this the “post-Easter rush”.

This happens because every year, people buy baby rabbits at pet stores as Easter presents, usually for children. In a couple of months, these baby balls of fluff have grown up to be teenagers: active, curious, destructive, hormonal and messy. And then they end up at the shelter.

So a friendly reminder this weekend! Rabbits:

* Can live over 10 years with proper care

* Should be spayed/neutered for better health & behaviour

* Should see a specialized vet for medical care

* Prefer not to be picked up and cuddled

* Should live in a pen or free-range, NOT in a pet store cage

* Are not the best choice of pets for small children

* Are high-maintenance pets!

If you’re going to buy a rabbit this weekend, make it a chocolate one.

If you’re serious about getting a rabbit as a pet, stop and do some research, and then look at local shelters for adoption - most of them will even come spayed/neutered. Don’t buy from a pet store. Try and get an adult rabbit, or if you want to get a young rabbit, do some more research, because just like puppies and kittens, young rabbits need some extra care.

For more info on proper rabbit care, check out the House Rabbit Society:

http://rabbit.org/

Or the Ontario Rabbit Education Organization:

http://ontariorabbits.org/

Or hey, you can send me an ask!

But please, if you’re giving a rabbit as a gift this Easter, make it chocolate.

betathoughts:

youreawizardsophie:

inner—utopia:

ask-rainy-water-princess:

genocidershodan:

lemonteaflower:

anxiety.

Or, you know, you could just stop saying sorry.

I take it you don’t have anxiety.

You can’t “just stop saying sorry”. You do something, something so little, like accidentally bump into someone. You feel horrible about it. Your brain starts panicking and you have trouble trying to breathe. You stutter an apology. They say it’s okay, but you accidentally do it again, and you apologize again. They just say “Aha, you can stop saying sorry.” And you feel horrible that you’ve probably made them angry or upset, so you mutter out an apology for the third stupid time, and they just say to stop saying sorry. Stop saying sorry. 

You can’t just tell someone to stop saying you’re sorry.

…Wow. I’m usually the one that tells people to stop saying sorry. I actually learned something on Tumblr, thanks!

same here. it..i guess i didn’t really understand why it was a thing people did. i’m the sort of person who finds it REALLY IRRITATING but i get so wrapped up in that that i forget/don’t realise that there’s all that stuff going on in thier head because my anxiety doesn’t present that way. important thing to see, this is.

I’m not on the extreme side of this, but I am prone to apologizing more than necessary. I don’t end up panicking, but I do experience anxiety. It’s embarrassing, too, you just want to apologize because you are afraid your small transgression will somehow avalanche into social rejection or anger, that it may somehow be some sort of tipping point. And the only way to avoid this is by apologizing, right? But apologizing a lot can be annoying to others, and you know it, so you feel sorry for saying sorry. And suddenly the sorry itself becomes a transgression. And this can become a vicious cycle of embarrassment and shame. You start out already feeling less worthy, somehow ashamed of yourself, and so you apologize, but you are lesser because of your apology. And saying “just stop saying sorry” makes it worse, because it implies that it is easy to stop. But how is it easy to stop apologizing for your actions when you feel you need to apologize for yourself?

That’s how I understand it, anyways.

Things to remember when you want to say “no,” assert yourself, and ask for what you want

thelesbianborderline:

  1. If I say “no” to someone and they get angry, this does not mean I should have said “yes.”
  2. Saying “no” does not make me selfish.
  3. Although I want to please the people I care about, I do not have to please them all the time.
  4. It is okay to want or need something from someone else. 
  5. My wants and needs are just as important as those of anyone else.
  6. I have the right to assert myself, even if I may inconvenience others. 

threeofeight:

It’s 6am and I cannot watch an episode of Voyager without this happening. Thanks for that tumblr ;D WOOO SPACE, YEAH EXPLORATION, HEY LOOK SPACE DUST GUYS GUUUUUYS SPPPPACEEEE.

I saw the movie Her tonight. I whole-heartedly recommend it, especially to those who are interested in thinking about A.I.s and/or human interaction with them. It literally awed me, especially the end.

(It is written & directed by a guy named Spike Jonze, if that helps you find it. Although just to warn you, it isn’t for young audiences-  there are some make-out sessions and such.)